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The Sainsburys Myths

January 29, 2011

Stop Sainsburys have published the ‘Seven Myths’ as counter arguments to the main Hypermarket proposals.

http://www.stopsainsburys.co.uk/seven-myths/

Excellent diligent expose by hard working community residents and volunteers. These people give up their free time to try to protect their neighbourhood from the damage that a massive new store at Ashton Gate would cause.

Vital and important information is now available to councillors and the powers that be so once again an informed decision can be made.

Only downside is these guys are too polite. I’ve dished out a taster of what the plain english society would say already and there’s plenty more too come. As I’m pee-eed off with the bully-boy supermarkets who’ve caused me to waste so much of my  life reading their stuff.

For every point put forward by the agents for hypermarket there is a counter argument by local residents.

That’s not to say everyone is against the Mega-store. In fact I will concede a benefit for the first time in the interest of Fifa fair play. That is the opening up of Colliters Brook to create a cycle-way and footpath with new trees, excellent plan. In fact the football club could do it right now, what’s stopping them?

Even for this improvement is there is a drawback. Every border garden or greenspace to every supermarket I know becomes a rubbish-strewn tip. If you don’t believe me take a look at the Asda greenspace by Coronation Rd or the Sainsburys greenspace by Winterstoke. These billionaire money-takers can’t be arsed to employ someone on minimum wage to clear their litter for a few hours a week, dents their profit margins too much.

 

recyling_mess2

mountains of rubbish

The supermarket chains talk talk about community, history shows they don’t walk the walk.

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13 Comments
  1. Country Cousin permalink
    February 1, 2011 10:48 pm

    Sacred Spring,
    Your right, opening up the brook is a good plan, in fact there doesn’t seem to be a good reason not to expose it all the way through the park. It would make a good wildlife feature and could be an added attraction to the park. It needn’t interfer with the footy pitches either, as it could run down the basin- road side under the bridge (obviously would still need a culvert under the road) and be diverted through the green space through the river. A few of these schemes have been done in other places and do not make it more likely to flood the park, in fact with good design, they seem to reduce risk of flooding further upstream as there is no culvert to get blocked. Shame this couldn’t be done independently of the hypermarket plan.

  2. Richard Lane permalink
    February 2, 2011 6:52 pm

    Sacredspring
    For every exagerated claim by the opponents of these schemes there is a countering argument, I do say exagerated before people jump on me.
    Regarding the proposed jobs. If jobs are diminishing due to automation at the tills, it would seem sensible to increase the chance of more employment by increasing the amount of people employed restocking shelves and replenishing the stores stockrooms from the distribution centres.
    Well done for spotting at least one of the good points from these plans.
    Will you contribute towards the cost of opening up the drainage ditch and relocating the offices currently loocated in this area of the ground. Not to mention the loss of parking spaces currently available, which would result in more on road parking problems during matchdays.

  3. February 2, 2011 7:43 pm

    If I had half a billion quid in the bank I’d definitely sort out the clubs lack of community enhancement. That entrance is a disgrace-massive spiked railings and cctv everywhere-treating the public and supporters like caged animals. A fraction of one of the top nobs paypacket would transform the place into a tree lined oasis. I’d gladly give up my time for free and can provide plants but I’m not wealthy like the clubs directors so cant spare much cash.
    Country cousin-thanks nice detail on how the club could improve the matchday experience for fans and residents. What could be more pleasant than a relaxing walk along the stream after the odd stressful occasion when your team gets battered?

  4. Richard Lane permalink
    February 2, 2011 8:25 pm

    Sacredspring
    Those railings are to stop nutters getting into private property and doing damage.
    Let’s face it you just want to have a dig at the clubs major shareholder at any opportunity.
    It’s a working environment completely enclosed and has no need to be artificially enhanced.
    When these schemes come to fruition, there will be much tree planting and nature enhancing going on, but if not maybe they could expose some more of the ditch.
    On the subject of trees, I’m a bit upset as the one in my back garden appears to be having an adverse effect on my neighbours foundations and needs to be felled.

  5. Mr Craig Shortwood permalink
    February 2, 2011 10:16 pm

    sacredspring – who has half a billion quid in the bank?

  6. Richard Lane permalink
    February 2, 2011 10:38 pm

    Mr Craig Shortwood
    Sacredspring thinks that Mr Lansdown has Half a billion in the bank. He thinks that he should pay for the upkeep and improvement of the community from his wealth. That is as well as bankrolling the football club which in itself gives so much to the community via the business generated and jobs provided.
    He forgets that the vast majority of that wealth is most likely on paper and is subject to the fluctuating stock market. I believe Mr Lansdown has realised somewhere in the region of £100m in the last two years from share sales, I wait to be corrected.
    A fair chunk of that appears to have been allocated for use towards the new stadium, with much of it already being used to fund the purchase of land and the prolonged planning process.

  7. Paul Bemmy Down permalink
    February 3, 2011 11:03 am

    Hi Rich.
    You can,t always believe what is reported, but it was said that SL raised about £40 million by the sale of HL shares to fund the stadium at a price of £2.20 per share. These shares are now trading at £5.30 so obviously he would have been far better off had he not sold. At a later date, in an interview with the Times, he said he had sold more shares and would use some of the proceeds to set up a company investing in renewable energy. This is my recollection so may not be totally correct.

  8. Southville Deli permalink
    February 3, 2011 6:48 pm

    ” If jobs are diminishing due to automation at the tills, it would seem sensible to increase the chance of more employment by increasing the amount of people employed restocking shelves and replenishing the stores stockrooms from the distribution centres”

    Why would it seem sensible to do that? Is there no back room automation? Don’t machines reduce the need for costly staff?

    You’ll have to wait a long time for self service tills on North Street! – So jobs are safe.

  9. paps permalink
    February 3, 2011 11:44 pm

    “If jobs are diminishing due to automation at the tills, it would seem sensible to increase the chance of more employment by increasing the amount of people employed restocking shelves and replenishing the stores stockrooms from the distribution centres.”

    Automation of tills doesn’t mean an increase in turnover, and a resulting increase in the need for restocking, etc.

    In fact, Sainsburys on Winterstoke have reduced available overtime due to under-trading.

  10. Southville Deli permalink
    February 4, 2011 1:40 pm

    Richard, Please explain!

  11. Richard Lane permalink
    February 4, 2011 6:43 pm

    Explanation: If a bigger store is built with a greater turnover, more staff will be required than at present, even if it’s for restocking shelves or involved in the distribution of those goods, whether at the depot or in transit.
    Now are we going to have another case of you say this and I say that? Basically Sainsbury’s will be employing many more staff than they presently do at the existing store.
    I have just been shopping in stapleton rd an St Marks rd. It is a bustling hive of activity, just a short distance from the giant Tesco store that everyone said would close local shops, It hasn’t.
    Everyone says that supermarkets close down high st shops. That may be the case in high streets. North st is not a high st in town, it is a main shopping st in a large city. There is a large population either side of it, just like the gloucester rd, which seems to be doing well. With no comparable place in south Bristol.

  12. February 4, 2011 7:18 pm

    Assume rich is referring to the giant tesco next to the monster Ikea on the other side of the M32.
    Cars back up from there to the motorway. Its become a hopeless traffic disaster nightmare for the poor residents.
    Stapleton rd Stmarks rd totally different -failed comparison.

  13. Deano permalink
    February 4, 2011 10:36 pm

    “Basically Sainsbury’s will be employing many more staff than they presently do at the existing store.”

    What, you mean like they said they would last time?

    750 jobs they said, how many are there today? Less than 400.

Comments are closed.